Summer, 2017

Current Stories

Blairstown Museum

Every town should have one: a place where a visitor can stop in and see what the place is all about; an informal rest stop where you can sit, relax, and enjoy friendly conversation about local curiosities, things to do, and places to go.

Branchville Country

On the way North through Sussex County on Rt. 206, there's a tiny, old-time borough called Branchville. Just one-half square mile large, it is packed with history, old buildings, new business and interesting people, and where contemporary meets traditional. Surrounded by mountains and glacial lakes, farms, wineries, campgrounds, state parks and forests,

Forest Flowers of Musconetcong Gorge

Broadly speaking, the most diverse forest ecosystems are ones with the fewest human interventions dating from modern times. Untouched land in New Jersey is rare if not non-existent. Musconetcong Gorge Reservation has a special mix of natural and human history that makes it a rewarding botanical site in the late spring months of May and June.

The Mighty Musky

The Musconetcong River runs forty-two miles down from Lake Hopatcong to the Delaware River. But in that brief distance, the river and its valley describe, for better or worse, the evolution of modern American culture in the advance of agriculture, transportation and industry.

Barrels of Fun

A wave of new craft breweries has decorated the New Jersey countryside, often providing a disused building with a bright commercial future. What could be better than making beer, and lots of people happy, for a living?

History You Can Taste

The Garden State Heirloom Seed Society Museum, housed in a nineteenth century farm house, is an interactive and informative stroll through New Jersey?s storied agricultural past.

Skylands By Saddle

Through warm summer months and into fall, you can explore rivers, streams, fields, and hills and enjoy remote views and vistas?all from the saddle. Across the Skylands region, a horse can take you where no car can?faster and sometimes farther afield than your own two feet. Exercise? Certainly. But also the pleasure of working with a 1,000-pound companion who can handle the footwork.

Worthington State Forest

Few of the hikers, campers, canoeists, and nature lovers that visit Worthington realize that industrial pumps are responsible for the preserved wilderness and natural wonders that they enjoy there. Charles C. Worthington, a prominent and very wealthy New York socialite, sportsman, fisherman, and skilled rifleman, assembled this park in the late nineteenth century. He called it Buckwood Park.

Morris Canal Boat Takes The Long Way Home

The Canal Society of New Jersey recovered a Morris Canal boat buried under a house on the Jersey Shore and brought it home to Waterloo Village.

Schuyler-Hamilton House

Romance ensued between Betsy Schuyler and Alexander Hamilton, as the young, ambitious soldier courted the beautiful socialite in this historic Morristown home during the 1779-80 Revolutionary War encampment.

Van Bunschooten Museum

The home was erected for Rev. Elias Van Bunschooten, a Dutch Reformed minister?also a farmer and mill operator?who settled there on one thousand acres along present-day Route 23 in Wantage, just as the road begins its steep ascent towards High Point.

Wildflower Hunting at Jenny Jump

Native perennial wildflowers bloom briefly, anywhere from one to four weeks, depending on the species. That means a regular visit to particularly robust nature preserves can reveal different wildflowers blooming each time. Jenny Jump State Forest has a magical variation in elevation and terrain that makes it a rewarding site for spring forest flowers.

Canoeing the Delaware River

The main stem of the Delaware, 331 miles from Hancock, NY, to its mouth at Cape May Point, NJ, is the longest free-flowing river in Eastern United States.

Float the Wild Side on the Wallkill River

Follow the tiny but mighty Wallkill River on its 88.3-mile journey north through eastern Sussex County into New York State. From out of Lake Mohawk, it spills over a dam then becomes a stream unseen by most, running through town parks, woodland, and past parking lots and businesses. It's dammed in Franklin to form Franklin Pond, the town's reservoir, and, in Hamburg, is stocked with trout before it flows through the Wallkill River National Wildlife Refuge and into New York.

Paradise Lost, and Found at Blue Mountain Lakes

The pristine aura at Blue Mountain Lake yields scant evidence of the ambitious development for which it was created. Ironically, the land on which the community was built is still, to this day, a wilderness escape .

Wildlife Management Area Hikes

Discover over 305,000 acres of little known forests, meadows, streams, and lakes collectively called Wildlife Management Areas - all public property, all owned by the people of New Jersey.

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